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Russell Johnson

Associate Professor
Department: Management
Office:
North Business Building
632 Bogue St Rm N438
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 884-1672
Curriculum Vitae
  • Biography
    Russell E. Johnson (johnsonr@broad.msu.edu) is an associate professor of management in the Eli Broad College of Business at Michigan State University. Previously, he was a member of the faculty at the University of South Florida. He received his Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of Akron. His research examines the roles of motivation-, justice-, and leadership-based processes that underlie work attitudes and behaviors. His research has been published in Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Management, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personnel Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, and Research in Organizational Behavior, among other journals. His research has been cited in popular press outlets such as Forbes, The Globe and Mail, Harvard Business Review, NBC's Today, NPRPsychology Today, TIME, and Wall Street Journal. He is a past associate editor and guest editor at Academy of Management Review, and serves on the editorial boards at Academy of Management JournalAcademy of Management ReviewJournal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, The Leadership Quarterly, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and Personnel Psychology, among others. In 2013, Dr. Johnson received the Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award for Science from the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and in 2018 he received the Cummings Scholarly Achievement Award from the Organizational Behavior Division of Academy of Management. Originally from Canada, he still dreams of one day playing in the National Hockey League and living in a two-story igloo with an attached dog sled garage.
  • Publications
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Selenta, C., & Lord, R. G. (2006). When organizational justice and the self-concept meet: Consequences for the organization and its members. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 99, 175-201.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Chang, C.-H., & Lord, R. G. (2006). Moving from cognition to behavior: What the research says. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 381-415.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., & Chang, C.-H. (2006). "I" is to continuance as "we" is to affective: The relevance of the self-concept for organizational commitment. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 27, 549-570.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., & Levy, P. E. (2008). Getting to the core of core self-evaluations: A review and recommendations. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 29, 391-413.
    Article
    Swann, W. B., Jr., Johnson, R. E., & Bosson, J. K. (2009). Identity negotiation at work. In B. M. Staw & A. P. Brief (Eds.), Research in Organizational Behavior (Vol. 29, pp. 81-109). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.
    Article
    Rosen, C. C., Chang, C.-H., Johnson, R. E., & Levy, P. E. (2009). Perceptions of the organizational context and psychological contract breach: Assessing competing perspectives. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 108, 202-217.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Tolentino, A. L., Rodopman, O. B., & Cho, E. (2010). We (sometimes) know not how we feel: Predicting work behaviors with an implicit measure of trait affectivity. Personnel Psychology, 63, 197-219.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., & Lord, R. G. (2010). Implicit effects of justice on self-identity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 95, 681-695.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Chang, C.-H., & Yang, L. (2010). Commitment and motivation at work: The relevance of employee identity and regulatory focus. Academy of Management Review, 35, 226-245.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., & Saboe, K. (2011). Measuring implicit traits in organizational research: Development of an indirect measure of employee implicit self-concept. Organizational Research Methods, 14, 530-547.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., & Djurdjevic, E. (2011). Assessing the impact of common method variance on higher-order multidimensional constructs. Journal of Applied Psychology, 96, 744-761.
    Article
    Ferris, D. L., Rosen, C. C., Johnson, R. E., Brown, D. J., Risavy, S., & Heller, D. (2011). Approach or avoidance (or both?): Integrating core self-evaluations within an approach/avoidance framework. Personnel Psychology, 64, 137-161.
    Article
    Eatough, E. M., Chang, C.-H., Miloslavic, S., & Johnson, R. E. (2011). Relationships of role stressors with organizational citizenship behavior: A meta-analysis. Journal of Applied Psychology, 96, 619-632.
    Article
    Uhlmann, E. L., Leavitt, K., Menges, J. I., Koopman, J., Howe, M. D., & Johnson, R. E. (2012). Getting explicit about the implicit: A taxonomy of implicit measures and guide for their use in organizational research. Organizational Research Methods, 15, 553-601.
    Article
    Lanaj, K., Chang, C.-H., & Johnson, R. E. (2012). Regulatory focus and work-related outcomes: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 138, 998-1034.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Venus, M., Lanaj, K., Mao, C., & Chang, C.-H. (2012). Leader identity as an antecedent of the frequency and consistency of transformational, consideration, and abusive leadership behaviors. Journal of Applied Psychology, 97, 1262-1272.
    Article
    Chang, C.-H., Ferris, D. L., Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., & Tan, J. A. (2012). Core self-evaluations: A review and evaluation of the literature. Journal of Management, 38, 81-128.
    Article
    Shi, J., Johnson, R. E., Liu, Y., & Wang, M. (2013). Linking subordinate political skill to supervisor dependence and reward recommendations: A moderated mediation model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 98, 374-384.
    Article
    Rosen, C. C., Slater, D. J., Chang, C.-H., & Johnson, R. E. (2013). Let's make a deal: Development and validation of the ex post i-deals scale. Journal of Management, 39, 709-742.
    Article
    Kim, Y. J., Van Dyne, L., Kamdar, D., & Johnson, R. E. (2013). Why and when do motives matter? An integrative model of motives, role cognitions, and social support as predictors of OCB. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 121, 231-245.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Howe, M. D., & Chang, C.-H. (2013). The importance of velocity, or why speed may matter more than distance. Organizational Psychology Review, 3, 62-85.
    Article
    Ferris, D. L., Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., Djurdjevic, E., Chang, C.-H., & Tan, J. A. (2013). When is success not satisfying? A moderated mediation model of the relation between core self-evaluation and job satisfaction. Journal of Applied Psychology, 98, 342-353.
    Article
    Ballinger, G. A., & Johnson, R. E. (2015). From the editors: Your first AMR review. Academy of Management Review, 40, 315-322.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., Chang, C.-H., & Lin, S.-H. (2016). Assessing the status of locus of control as an indicator of core self-evaluations. Personality and Individual Differences, 90, 155-162.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Chang, C.-H., Meyer, T., Lanaj, K., & Way, J. D. (2013). Approaching success or avoiding failure? Approach and avoidance motives in the work domain. European Journal of Personality, 27, 424-441.
    Article
    Yang, L., Bauer, J., Johnson, R. E., Groer, M., & Salomon, K. (2014). Physiological mechanisms that underlie the effects of interactional unfairness on deviant behavior: The role of cortisol activity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 99, 310-321.
    Article
    Lin, S.-H., Ma, J., & Johnson, R. E. (2016). When ethical leader behavior breaks bad: How ethical leader behavior can turn abusive via ego depletion and moral licensing. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101, 815-830.    
    Article
    Lanaj, K., Johnson, R. E., & Lee, S. (2016). Benefits of transformational behavior for leaders: A daily investigation of leader behavior and need fulfillment. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101, 237-251.
    Article
    Lanaj, K., Johnson, R. E., & Wang, M. (2016). When lending a hand depletes the will: The daily costs and benefits of helping. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101, 1097-1110.   
    Article
    Rosen, C. C., Koopman, J., Gabriel, A. S., & Johnson, R. E. (2016). Who strikes back? A daily investigation of when and why incivility begets incivility. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101, 1620-1634.   
    Article
    Yang, L., Bauer, J., Johnson, R. E., Groer, M., & Salomon, K. (2014). Physiological mechanisms that underlie the effects of interactional unfairness on deviant behavior: The role of cortisol activity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 99, 310-321.
    Article
    Lanaj, K., Johnson, R. E., & Barnes, C. M. (2014). Beginning the workday yet already depleted? Consequences of late-night smartphone use and sleep. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 124, 11-23.
    Article
    Lin, S.-H., Ma, J., & Johnson, R. E. (2016). When ethical leader behavior breaks bad: How ethical leader behavior can turn abusive via ego depletion and moral licensing. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101, 815-830.    
    Article
    Spector, P. E., Rosen, C. C., Richardson, H. A., Williams, L. J., & Johnson, R. E. (2019). A new perspective on method variance: A measure-centric approach. Journal of Management, 45, 855-880.
    Article
    Qin, X., Ren, R., & Johnson, R. E. (2018). Considering self-interests and symbolism together: How instrumental and value-expressive motives interact to influence supervisors’ justice behavior. Personnel Psychology, 71, 225-253.
    Article
    Gabriel, A. S., Campbell, J. T., Djurdjevic, E., Johnson, R. E., & Rosen, C. C. (2018). Fuzzy profiles: Comparing and contrasting latent profile analysis and fuzzy set analysis for person-centered research. Organizational Research Methods, 21, 877-904. 
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., Chang, C.-H., & Lin, S.-H. (2015). Getting to the core of locus of control: Is it a core evaluation of the self or the environment? Journal of Applied Psychology, 100, 1568-1578.
    Article
    Lin, S.-H., & Johnson, R. E. (2015). A suggestion to improve a day keeps your depletion away: Examining promotive and prohibitive voice behaviors within a regulatory focus and ego depletion framework. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100, 1381-1397.
    Article
    Gabriel, A. S., Koopman, J., Rosen, C. C., & Johnson, R. E. (2018). Helping others or helping oneself? An episodic examination of the behavioral consequences of helping at work. Personnel Psychology, 71, 85-107.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., King, D. D., Lin, S.-H., Scott, B. A., Jackson Walker, E. M., & Wang, M. (2017). Regulatory focus trickle-down: How leader regulatory focus shapes follower regulatory focus and behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 140, 29-45.
    Article
    Liao, Z., Yam, K. C. S., Johnson, R. E., Liu, W., & Song, Z. (2018). Cleansing my abuse: A reparative response model of perpetrating abusive supervisor behavior. Journal of Applied Psychology, 103, 1039-1056
    Article
    Venus, M., Johnson, R. E., Zhang, S., Wang, X.-H., & Lanaj, K. (2019). Seeing the big picture: A within-person examination of leader construal level and vision communication. Journal of Management, 45, 2666-2684. 
    Article
    Rosen, C. C., Simon, L. S., Gajendran, R., Johnson, R. E., Lee, H. W., & Lin, S.-H. (2019). Boxed in by your inbox: Implications of daily email demands for managers’ leadership behaviors. Journal of Applied Psychology, 104, 19-33.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Lanaj, K., & Barnes, C. M. (2014). The good and bad of being fair: Effects of procedural and interactional justice behaviors on actors’ regulatory resources. Journal of Applied Psychology, 99, 635-650.
    Article
    Johnson, R. E., Lin, S.-H., Kark, R., Van Dijk, D, King, D. D., & Esformes, E. (2017). Consequences of regulatory fit for leader–follower relationship quality and commitment. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 90, 379-406.
    Article
    Lee, H. W., Bradburn, J., Lin, S.-H., Johnson, R. E., & Chang, C.-H. (2019). The benefits of receiving gratitude for helpers: A daily investigation of proactive and reactive helping at work. Journal of Applied Psychology, 104, 197-213.
    Article
    Steinbach, A. L., Gamache, D. L., & Johnson, R. E. (in press). Don’t get it misconstrued: Construal level shifts and flexibility in the upper echelons. Academy of Management Review
    Article
    Song, Y., Liu, Y., Wang, M., Lanaj, K., Johnson, R. E., & Shi, J. (2018). A social mindfulness approach to understanding experienced customer mistreatment: A within-person field experiment. Academy of Management Journal, 61, 994-1020. 
    Article
    Kanfer, R., Frese, M., & Johnson, R. E. (2017). Motivation related to work: A century of progress. Journal of Applied Psychology, 102, 338-355.
    Article
    Qin, X., Huang, M., Johnson, R. E., Ju, D., & Hu, Q. (2018). The short-lived benefits of abusive supervisory behavior for actors: An investigation of recovery and work engagement. Academy of Management Journal, 61, 1951-1975.
    Book
    Ferris, D. L., Johnson, R. E., & Sedikides, C. (Eds.) (2018). The self at work: Fundamental theory and research. New York: Routledge.
    Article
    Gamache, D. L., McNamara, G., Mannor, M., & Johnson, R. E. (2015). Motivated to acquire? The impact of CEO regulatory focus on firm acquisitions. Academy of Management Journal, 58, 1261-1282.
    Article
    Qin, X., Ren, R., Zhang, Z., & Johnson, R. E. (2015). Fairness heuristics and substitutability effects: Inferring the fairness of outcomes, procedures, and interpersonal treatment when employees lack clear information. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100, 749-766.
    Article
    Powell, G. N., Greenhaus, J. H., Allen, T. D., & Johnson, R. E. (2019). Advancing and expanding work-life theory from multiple perspectives. Academy of Management Review, 44, 54-71. 
    Article
    Koopmann, J., Johnson, R. E., Wang, M., Lanaj, K., Wang, G., & Shi, J. (2019). A self-regulation perspective on how and when regulatory focus differentially relates to citizenship behaviors. Journal of Applied Psychology, 104, 629-641. 
    Article
    Scott, B. A., Awasty, N., Johnson, R. E., Matta, F., & Hollenbeck, J. R. (in press). Origins and destinations, distances and directions: Accounting for the journey in the emotion regulation process. Academy of Management Review.
    Article
    Lennard, A. C., Scott, B. A., & Johnson, R. E. (2019). Turning frowns (and smiles) upside down: A multilevel examination of surface acting positive and negative emotions on well-being. Journal of Applied Psychology, 104, 1164-1180. 
    Article
    Koopman, J., Lin, S.-H., Lennard, A. C., Matta, F. K., & Johnson, R. E. (in press). My coworkers are treated more fairly than me! A self-regulatory perspective on justice social comparisons. Academy of Management Journal.
    Article
    Koopman, J., Rosen, C. C., Gabriel, A. S., Puranik, H., Johnson, R. E., & Ferris, D. L. (in press). Why and for whom does the pressure to help hurt others? Emotional and cognitive mechanisms linking helping pressure to workplace deviance. Personnel Psychology.
  • Courses
    • MGT 411: Staffing
    • MGT 460: Management Capstone
    • WMBA 873F: Evidence-Based Leadership
    • MGT 325: Introduction to Management
    • MGT 840: Leadership & Team Management
    • MGT 909: Seminar in Human Resource Management
    • MGT 907: Seminar in Organizational Behavior
  • Links

Related News:

Keep to yourself! Don’t offer co-workers help unless asked, Broad College research finds  
If you thought that proactively offering help to your co-workers was a good thing, think again.
Is email evil? Bosses are getting boxed in by their inboxes  
Keeping up with email traffic places high demands on managers, which prevents them from achieving their goals
An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrow  
That's according to research by Russell Johnson, a Broad College professor
Management faculty honored for scholarly achievement  
Russell Johnson lands the Cummings Scholarly Achievement Award
The Dark Side of Helping Coworkers 
New research suggests helping behavior can be particularly harmful when it’s done in the morning hours
The Dark Side of Helping Coworkers  
If you show up at work tired, you may want to focus strictly on your own tasks
Charisma-Challenged? You Can Still Be a Good Boss  
You don’t need the charisma of Steve Jobs to be an effective boss, indicates new research led by the Broad College
Incivility: A Workplace Epidemic 
Michigan State University business scholar shows how incivility may be spreading in the workplace.
Helping Co-Workers Can Wear You Out 
Russell Johnson says depletion effects are especially strong for employees with high “pro-social motivation”.
Johnson named Withrow Emerging Scholar  
Russell Johnson has been honored as the 2014 recipient of the Withrow Emerging Scholar Award
Nighttime smartphone use zaps workers' energy 
Using a smartphone to cram in more work at night results in less work the next day, indicates new research
Fair bosses pay a price  
Bosses who are fair make their workers happier and their companies more productive, but in the end may be burning themse
Nighttime smartphone use zaps workers' energy  
Using a smartphone to cram in more work at night results in less work the next day